Myers-Briggs Meets Politics

Posted Apr 3, 2016 at 19:13. Revised Aug 14, 2019 at 08:17.

J.D. Nobody cannot help but notice the intuitive connections between some concepts from Jungian psychology and various personalities in the 2016 American presidential contest – Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders. The Myers-Briggs® psychological inventory (test) and its underlying Jungian concepts reveal much about commonalities between these two personalities that each would no doubt hotly deny. Looking at these personalities through Jungian and traditional Chinese eyes reveals some things that American eyes miss.

American eyes typically view conflicting situations as having “either-or” choices having simple, conflicting cause and effect relationships. The traditional Chinese and Jungian view sees such situations as being the result of two opposing forces that are bound together, normally work together, and only sometimes come into conflict with each other.

The Myers-Briggs approach to understanding different people provides a way for describing different personalities. It does not label personalities judgmentally, but descriptively, in the way that color can describe a car. There is nothing right or wrong or superior or inferior in the Myers-Briggs personality descriptions just as there is nothing inherently good or bad about a yellow vs. green car. In both cases, these are only descriptions, not judgments. Of course, an individual may like certain personality attributes more than others, but that is a separate matter from declaring a particular personality to be inherently good or bad.

To be continued.

Now you can honestly say Nobody told me.

Copyright © 2016-2019 Charles E. Dial. All rights reserved.
Posted Apr 3, 2016 at 19:13. Revised Aug 14, 2019 at 08:17. –> Retrieved Aug 25, 2019 at 01:32.
Transcript News Feed: https://ct.complexitytrap.org/feed/

Other Complexity Traps

Posted Apr 3, 2016 at 14:48. Revised Aug 14, 2019 at 08:17.

J.D. Nobody has discovered that the name Complexity Trap has been used in academic articles about vaguely similar concepts to those this blog discusses. JD Nobody was unaware of this usage until recently but has looked into the thoughts put forth by those authoring articles about the Other Complexity Trap. They are addressing similar problems to those addressed by The Complexity Trap, but are addressing them primarily from military and foreign policy perspective. Rather, The Complexity Trap blog addresses complexity issues from a sociological and political perspectives. The two perspectives do overlap.

Curiously, the other complexity trap was not discovered by J.D. Nobody when searching for and registering the domain name for this blog. A scholarly presentation by Sebastian Gorka, Michael J. Gallagher, and Joshua A. Geltzer at http://www.iwp.edu/news_publications/detail/the-complexity-trap presents another view of complexity traps. Their ideas parallel those of J.D. Nobody, but by virtue of those authors being Somebodies, none of their readers can say Nobody told me.

It is important to keep a historical perspective on complexity because there probably have been other times in history when people faced as much complexity as we face today. A key difference is that in earlier times there was not as much technology to generate problems, or in turn to generate as much help in solving them. It is unclear whether a complexity trap or a series of complexity trap cycles will ultimately devolve into chaos. Devolution into chaos will happen when people no longer see any hope for moving forward.

Short of falling into despair, it is vitally important to strategically plan and prioritize all the available resources. By definition, not all aspects of a complex situation can be addressed, due to the complexity itself. Nevertheless, any thought out strategy is better than nothing at all.

Now you can honestly say Nobody told me.

Copyright © 2016-2019 Charles E. Dial. All rights reserved.
Posted Apr 3, 2016 at 14:48. Revised Aug 14, 2019 at 08:17. –> Retrieved Aug 25, 2019 at 01:32.
Transcript News Feed: https://ct.complexitytrap.org/feed/

Just Wait

Posted Mar 18, 2016 at 18:22. Revised Aug 23, 2019 at 12:49.

J.D. Nobody recalls the first presidential election in which he was able to vote – the 1964 election between Barry Goldwater and Lyndon Johnson. J.D. Nobody and most of the country was caught up in the fear that Goldwater was a near lunatic who would involve the country in a nuclear war. Despite having served in a fighter squadron with fighter pilots like Goldwater and having met him personally, J.D. Nobody believed the picture of Goldwater painted by the Johnson campaign.

There was recognition that some of what Goldwater was saying was the impulsive bravado of a fighter pilot, and many – including J.D. Nobody – did not recognize that Goldwater’s boast of nuking the Vietnamese into oblivion was only a locker room boast. It was not something he would have done when faced with making a command decision.

J.D. Nobody did have the prescience to see Goldwater’s expressed concerns as legitimate ones that would erupt in a bigger way later if not addressed. J.D. gave some of his ultra-liberal acquaintances the admonition “If you think Goldwater is bad from your point of view, just wait until you see what the pipeline of the future will deliver!”

None of these people could accept that anything worse could happen in the future. In prosecuting the Vietnam war Johnson did everything that Goldwater had advocated, and worse – such as effectively manufacturing the Gulf of Tonkin incident to ensnare America further in the Vietnam War. Johnson had made the first “just wait” happen sooner than anyone expected. Once again, J.D. Nobody’s admonition “if you think this is bad from your point of view, just wait.”.

A “just wait” soon arrived in the person of Richard Nixon. Nixon had some important accomplishments as president, despite there being much hand-wringing over how anybody could be worse than Nixon. Watergate was the best “just wait” yet.

The arrival of Ronald Reagan raised the cries of anguish once again. Nixon was no longer the greatest disaster of all time. J.D. Nobody now pointed out “if you think Ronald Reagan is bad from your point of view, just wait.”.

The cries of “no one could be worse” arose once again for George H. W. Bush. Again, just wait.

With the arrival of the Clintons came a jackboot political machine powered only by the polls. A jackboot political machine is not a bad thing; just a return to normalcy.

Next, there was George W. Bush, and once again the cries of anguish rose to a higher level yet. Ronald Reagan was no longer the greatest disaster of all time. Another opportunity for J.D. Nobody to point out “if you think George W. Bush is bad from your point of view, just wait.”.

And the progression goes on with Donald J. Trump and Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton and AOC and Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Omar…

Notice any pattern?

Tomorrow, there will be someone worse yet. Just wait.

Now you can honestly say Nobody told me.

Copyright © 2016-2019 Charles E. Dial. All rights reserved.
Posted Mar 18, 2016 at 18:22. Revised Aug 23, 2019 at 12:49. –> Retrieved Aug 25, 2019 at 01:32.
Transcript News Feed: https://ct.complexitytrap.org/feed/

America’s State Religion

Posted Feb 22, 2016 at 20:23. Revised Jul 8, 2019 at 06:53.

Contrary to popular opinion, America has an established state religion that has the full support of the government and the people. That religion is Utilitarianism, and its creed believes in and practices pragmatism over all else. Practicing this religion requires no sacrifice, inconvenience, or financial contribution by its members. It only requires one to act pragmatically in all matters.

Utilitarianism is the most inclusive of all the world’s religions. Christian? Muslim? Atheist? All are welcome in the Utilitarian Church and need to make no adjustments to or repudiation of their respective creeds.

You don’t understand the things that are going on in society, business, and government? All you need to understand is the religion that binds it all together preaches that everything in the world is rooted in pragmatism.

Utilitarianism is both a balm and a bomb for dealing with complexity.

The 4 M’s are critically important to the pragmatism that endows a Utilitarian with power, prestige, and position. These four roles are particularly treacherous because people functioning in any of them are dangerous, but the imprecision of these parts is a tool that a skillful Utilitarian can manipulate.

The 4 M characteristics are:

  • A. Military
  • A. Missionary
  • B. Minister
  • B. Medical

It is important for you to understand that although these roles look unrelated, they have a strong common thread that makes them a single state religion topic. Each of these fields of endeavor attracts people who are focused less on the pragmatism of the moment than they are in service and dedication to others. It is common for more than one of these idealistic presentations to occur in the same person, so keeping such a person dedicated to the pursuit of pragmatism can be difficult.

When you understand the 4 M’s as well as do our model evangelists at FirtstU you will see clearly that their time-proven principles for church command and control are central to all bureaucracies everywhere. They owe part of their success to their insight into how to use the 4 M’s to advance their power and glory through pragmatism.

Understand also that these 4 roles consist of two pairs of counterbalancing opposites that nevertheless cooperate with each other most of the time. This ying-yang concept of Eastern cultures is one of the cornerstones of pragmatism. The effective evangelist understands when to use the Eastern concept of counterbalancing opposite pieces that also work cooperatively, but can easily shift into the Western cause and effect way of looking at things whenever it is pragmatic. We are most familiar with cause and effect thinking, which assumes that when something good or bad happens there is one thing primarily responsible for causing it and that either strengthening or smashing the cause giving the particular result serves pragmatism perfectly.

The particularly important military case is so often misunderstood. Make no mistake, my evangelists; these people are both pragmatists and idealists and that fact will work to your advantage with a little skill. There is an obvious benefit to having a person around that follows orders and is loyal to his buddies to the point of giving up his life for them. Just make sure that he identifies you in his mind as one of his buddies and a deserving object for his loyalty.

Observe that there is a thread of idealism in military behavior that can threaten the pragmatism of your operation. Paradoxically, the shadow side nature of this idealism makes it a valuable antidote for any idealism that might erupt in your organization. This antidote works because the typical militarist so hates his shadow side idealism and so loves following orders that he will lash out decisively at any infestation of idealism that might raise its head.

Now you can honestly say Nobody told me.

Copyright © 2016-2019 Charles E. Dial. All rights reserved.
Posted Feb 22, 2016 at 20:23. Revised Jul 8, 2019 at 06:53. –> Retrieved Aug 25, 2019 at 01:32.
Transcript News Feed: https://ct.complexitytrap.org/feed/

The Importance of Being Nobody

Posted Feb 22, 2016 at 18:28. Revised Jul 15, 2019 at 07:17.

Being J.D. Nobody makes me a most important person. Indeed, millions of people quote me every day when they find themselves in a mess. The great beauty in being able to say “Nobody told me” is that no one can ever question you about whether it is true or false. You win either way when you quote me or pretend to quote me because it will be unclear to your listener whether the word “nobody” is a proper noun or just a convenient collective noun. Moreover, this tool which I am providing to the world is perfect for keeping honest lawyers honest.

The power I grant to you to quote me is unlimited, and it provides you with a “get out of jail free card” for use in any situation in which you have screwed up or are unjustly accused of screwing up.

Use this power wisely, and use it in full compliance with the creed of America’s one true state religion, embodied in the beliefs of The National Utilitarian Church. That simple and profound creed embodies our unswerving belief in pragmatism and nothing else.

Panic-filled pragmatism is the typical result of twenty-first-century complexity. Also, the more complexities people find in the world around them the more likely they are to seek too much simplification. The mission of The Complexity Trap and ScholarZero Publishing is to give you the cover you need to be able to say “Nobody told me” when someone challenges you. This response will be especially true when I, J.D. Nobody, have in fact told you something you don’t want to admit to knowing.

Now you can honestly say Nobody told me.

Copyright © 2016-2019 Charles E. Dial. All rights reserved.
Posted Feb 22, 2016 at 18:28. Revised Jul 15, 2019 at 07:17. –> Retrieved Aug 25, 2019 at 01:32.
Transcript News Feed: https://ct.complexitytrap.org/feed/