The Battle At Jericho

Posted Oct 19, 2016 at 19:09. Revised Aug 14, 2019 at 08:17.

J.D. Nobody recalls a history professor from his college years who delighted in giving his students an examination question challenging them to “compare and contrast” a certain leader or event to another leader or event. It was a good way to get his students to think about both the similarities and the differences in the ways situations interconnected and subsequently affected later developments. The professor’s approach to attaching meanings to events started with asking each student to determine what the facts were and then to form opinions about how the events interrelated with each other and sometimes produced unexpected consequences.

In and of itself, starting with facts and forming conclusions and opinions based on them contrasts with the approach used in the current politically correct methodology, wherein feelings trump thinking, and facts and opinions are essentially the same things. This muddying of the water between facts and opinions is important to understanding how things are unfolding today. Today, comparing and contrasting two different events challenges a person’s ability to think clearly. The more complex the world becomes, the more people are inclined to deal with it by embracing an oversimplified simplicity that either dismisses or equates facts and logic.

According to the Bible, Joshua was the appointed successor to Moses and the commander of the Israeli army. He was ordered by God to capture the fortified city of Jericho using some rather strange tactics. Joshua sent spies into the city, who made contact with the town prostitute and recruited her help for the upcoming battle. She agreed to help if the Israelis agreed to spare her life when the battle was over.

Each day for a week the Israeli army marched around the walls of Jericho three times, sounding a trumpet and making no threatening actions toward the city. At the end of this period of crazy behavior, Joshua ordered the attack on the city. The attack succeeded and Joshua ordered everyone in the city killed, except for the city prostitute.

Now is the time for the “compare and contrast” test mentioned earlier. J.D. Nobody proposes that the reader compare and contrast Donald Trump’s presidential campaign craziness to the craziness of Joshua at the battle of Jericho. There is no “correct answer” to this “compare and contrast” test question. Be aware that in looking for similarities and differences there is a great opportunity for the reader to conflate fact and opinion.

Now you can honestly say Nobody told me.

Copyright © 2016-2019 Charles E. Dial. All rights reserved.
Posted Oct 19, 2016 at 19:09. Revised Aug 14, 2019 at 08:17. –> Retrieved Aug 25, 2019 at 00:34.
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The Chinese Connection

Posted Sep 18, 2016 at 22:27. Revised Aug 14, 2019 at 08:17.

Chinese and Americans have spent the last 150 years or more trying to understand each other and have managed to achieve some success at it. This venture was not easy because the cultural gulf between traditional Chinese and Western cultures is so wide that the possibility of much understanding looked remote indeed. Each side tended to perceive the other as ignorant and barbaric animals not worth dealing with, but those misconceptions became the starting point for a complexity cycle that is still unfolding today.

In the nineteenth century, some Americans began to look at China more positively than did the European colonial powers. The early Chinese immigrant communities in places like San Francisco had ways of doing things that began to make sense once Americans took the time to notice what the Chinese were doing and understand why they were doing it. San Franciscans, in particular, soon developed a love affair with Chinese cooking.

The Chinese, being good businessmen, quickly saw this love affair as an opportunity. Soon many Chinese restaurants were in business to serve their customers’ newly acquired tastes. The new foods caught on so completely with many people that they could not wait to eat any and all new food that the city’s Chinese restaurants might offer.

According to legend, this desire for exotic new Chinese cuisine was satisfied by one restaurant owner in a clever and creative way. He announced to his customers that a ship had just arrived from China and was carrying a recipe for the newest and most exotic Chinese food of all, and he committed to preparing and serving this new delicacy starting on the following day.

The new food, which the restaurant owner named “chop suey,” was an instant success. Its name certainly sounded very Chinese, and the magic recipe for preparing it was quite simple. The restaurant owner simply took the previous day’s leftovers and served them attractively.

The only thing Chinese about chop suey was that a Chinese-American restaurant served it. No one questioned its Chinese origin, though, because the name sounded Chinese. People soon found out that chop suey was an American invention, but they did not mind being tricked. They regarded the restaurant owner as pretty creative and were able to chuckle over being tricked in such a harmless and creative way. Unlike those Westerners who looked down on everything Chinese, the patrons of these restaurants were gaining some understanding and respect for a people and a culture that most Westerners were dismissing.

The funniest thing of all is that chop suey is a common food in America to this day, and millions of Americans still believe that everybody in China eats chop suey. The enterprising restaurant owner would no doubt be very surprised by the widespread consequences of his little trick.

In a somewhat similar manner, an important Chinese food crop was unknown in America until it was brought to America from China. This crop, often with genetic modifications, now grows in America and is probably America’s most valuable single food crop. Few Americans connect this crop with China, but they are happy to believe that chop suey is a staple food in China.

The plant from China that is now America's most valuable food crop.Extensive fields of this Chinese crop now grow to a height of four feet (120 cm.) under good growing conditions, yet most Americans have no idea what this crop is, even when they see it. Here is a picture of the Chinese crop, growing in Ohio just before it ripened for harvest. Can you recognize and name this valuable food crop? Today, more of it is grown in the United States than in China!

About 140 years ago many people at the First Church in Oberlin, Ohio, had become aware of the extreme poverty in rural China and felt that Chinese peasants could benefit from gaining awareness of Western knowledge and religion. A more serious Chinese-American interaction came out of this awakening awareness. The birth of this interaction happened just one mile from the field now containing the pictured Chinese mystery crop.

image of the Shansi scrollA few of these concerned Ohioans and their families went to China’s Shanxi Province to set up a small church and school. The Clapp family, who were among those who had gone to Shanxi, returned to America on leave after spending several years in China. When the Clapps left for home, their students presented a scroll to them that thanked them for their work.

A year later the Clapps returned to Shanxi to continue their teaching. In 1900 everyone from Oberlin who was in Shanxi, including the Clapps, was killed in the Boxer Rebellion. Back in America the friends and families of those killed were determined to continue working to better the circumstances of Chinese peasants. They did not call for retribution against China.

In the years following the Boxer Rebellion a memorial to the missionary/teachers killed in the Rebellion was constructed in Oberlin, and an organization called the Shansi Association was formed to raise funds for sending teachers back to Shanxi. (In earlier times Shanxi was commonly spelled in English as Shansi.) In the first part of China’s Communist period the Shansi Association teachers were ordered out of China, which caused the organization to send its people to places like India and Japan instead. Today, Shansi teachers are once again in China at Beijing Normal University and Shanxi Agricultural University. The Shansi organization has remained involved in teaching in other Asian countries even though its people are again welcome in China.

The Shanxi scroll survived because the Clapps had left the scroll in America when they returned to China. More than 40 years later a member of the Clapp family found the scroll and recognized that it was important. It was presented to the First Church in Oberlin, where it remains on display today. An English translation of the scroll is on the First Church wall beside the scroll.

China today is a far different place from the China that gave birth to this scroll. Nevertheless, that earlier world is part of the continuity of Chinese history. It is noteworthy that this perhaps controversial piece of Chinese and American interaction survived Chairman Mao’s Cultural Revolution because it was on the opposite side of the world from China. Complexities sometimes play out in unexpected ways.

Now you can honestly say Nobody told me.

Copyright © 2016-2019 Charles E. Dial. All rights reserved.
Posted Sep 18, 2016 at 22:27. Revised Aug 14, 2019 at 08:17. –> Retrieved Aug 25, 2019 at 00:34.
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Trump – The Student of FDR?

Posted Jul 17, 2016 at 10:03. Revised Aug 14, 2019 at 08:17.

History is bunk, right? After all, if that were not the case modern, enlightened, up-to-date educators would not have all but eliminated it from curricula. People familiar with the last seventy years of history might spot a Complexity Trap cycle covering the period from Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) to Donald Trump. Ashes to ashes. J.D. Nobody didn’t know that Donald Trump would become President when this was written, but that is not the point. Beneath the surface, Trump, Roosevelt, and even Abraham Lincoln have some surprising similarities that their respective enthusiasts do not see. J.D. Nobody, however, clearly sees similarities between Trump and FDR.

Years ago J.D. Nobody had an acquaintance who was a deep thinker and scholar of history who understood that history is not bunk. He had an interesting theory: The U.S. has experienced three great crises since its founding, happening about 70 years apart. In his view, each crisis in America’s evolution involved different issues, but each was serious enough to put the country’s very survival in jeopardy.

Several characteristics have been common to all the crisis periods, with oversimplification being a primary one. Each crisis cycle has involved varying degrees of religious ferment in the years preceding its end. Most people underestimate both the complexities and the subtleties of the moment and wake up only when they are finally overwhelmed.

Each crisis has been marked by at least two political factions with strong, growing, deep convictions about whether or how to approach the perceived need for controversial change. The biggest faction is strong enough to block the next largest faction, but not strong enough to win the day. The political parties become more fragmented as the crisis comes to a head, and after the crisis, many voters “go over to the other side.” New political alignments and parties form, albeit some with the same name.

Changes coming out of each crisis period have resulted in at least some Constitutional change in governance. These changes happen either by formal Constitutional amendment or via “amendment by abandonment.” The abandonment route either simply ignores the Constitution’s requirements or uses as much glib lawyering as necessary to reinterpret the Constitution for the convenience of the moment.

Unfortunately, facts and logic become progressively less relevant as the crisis deepens. Both 85 years ago and today, most people have not recognized that the President has limited power to influence most events. Nevertheless, political theatrics have been central to fanning the perception that important political personalities have almost complete power over all events in the world and therefore must get the credit or blame for whatever happens.

The winner in a crisis period Presidential election is a controversial candidate who probably would not have been electable in immediately prior elections. His election victory is largely attributable to his having a dynamic, new personality and being able to seize the changed tone of the times and run with it. Most people perceive him as genuine, honest, and being concerned about them, whether or not he has those qualities. Once in office, the new President is hated by many, partly because of the need to expand presidential power to deal with the problems and partly because he must make decisions that will be widely hated.

“Crisis Zero”: The Revolutionary Period

Depending on how one counts, the U.S. has experienced four crises if one assumes that a crisis begins a cycle rather than ends it. The period between the publication of the Declaration of Independence in 1776 and the inauguration of George Washington as President in 1789 is Crisis Zero by this reckoning. By J.D. Nobody’s friend’s reckoning, the lead-up to Crisis One started after George Washington was inaugurated and ended with the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861.

Growing, but often unrecognized, relationship complexities and subtleties between England and the Colonies made the “crisis zero” period the first complexity trap in the nation’s history. The escape from the trap into a new era was long and not easy. The outcome of the Revolutionary War was far from certain, and the thirteen-year period under the Articles of Confederation was unstable.

Crisis One: The Constitutional Crisis

After breaking free of the Revolutionary period’s complexity trap, the nation embarked on a period of growth and prosperity fueled by having new territories to populate and by building the first transportation infrastructure. Replacing cowpaths with canals and railroads, growing the nation, and complementing slow mail communications with telegraphy ended in the constitutional complexity trap crisis. This crisis came to a head about 70 years after George Washington’s inauguration.

The Constitutional crisis was over the degree to which the states could govern themselves and whether states had the right to secede from the Union. Slavery was the third issue, and could not be addressed at the federal level because the Constitution reserved the needed authority to the individual states. These three issues resulted in the Civil War once passions on both sides finally reached the boiling point. The Crisis One troubles were highly visible and clearly seen by just about everyone.

Not until after Lincoln’s March 4, 1861 inauguration did this growing complexity trap become a full constitutional crisis. Just about everyone in the country was demonizing someone. Reason was almost completely missing from the scene. Lincoln was an exception to the lack of reason because he had a perspective tempered by being a Northerner, but had married into a Southern family.

When the war started most people thought the troubles would be resolved quickly because the other side would turn tail and run once confronted on the battlefield. The war’s opening battle – the First Battle of Bull Run, also called the Battle of First Manassas – occurred on July 21, 1861. The fierce fighting and many casualties sobered both armies, and only then did they realize that the war was going to be much longer and bloodier than either side had anticipated.

Many Washington, D.C. residents were so sure the rebellion would not last long that they came to the battlefield with picnics to see the rebels’ defeat. Instead, when the battle was over the picnickers were fleeing for their lives. Similarly, most people caught up in the next two crises were initially prone to minimizing the situation.

Initially, Lincoln’s thinking was that upholding the Constitution and keeping the nation together were more important than the slavery issue. Toward the war’s end, Lincoln changed his mind and made ending slavery his top priority. Deep wounds remained on both sides long after the war ended.

As in the later crises, the adversaries on each side were partly right. The Tenth Amendment to the Constitution denies all power to the federal government that the Constitution does not explicitly grant to the federal government. The Constitution makes it abundantly clear that the South was essentially correct on the states’ rights issue, while the North was right on the slavery issue. Ending slavery required a Constitutional amendment to give the federal government the expanded power needed.

The de facto Constitutional changes coming from Crisis One advanced the erosion of the Tenth Amendment’s original intent. This slow but relentless shift of power to the federal government caused both the people and the states to look progressively more to the federal government for solutions to problems.

Curiously, Britain’s recent vote to withdraw from the European Union is a modern “states’ rights” issue. In its way, history is repeating itself.

In the U.S., the political party alignments changed by Crisis One lasted for 70 to 100 years and reflected the growing trend toward more central power and a changed electorate. The new Republican Party became both the party of blacks who were able to vote and an advocate for more central power and business interests. The new Democratic Party became the party of farmers, laborers, and Southern whites. These somewhat illogical alignments slowly restructured themselves along more logical lines as a result of the 1965-1980 Civil Rights reforms.

Crisis Two: The Financial Crisis

Crisis Two, by the reckoning of J.D. Nobody‘s friend, was the financial crisis of the Great Depression. The Crisis Two complexity trap ended a 64 year period of growth and prosperity that was fueled by new territories to populate, industrialization, improved communication, and transportation innovations. In the course of one lifetime, the nation had become a nation of 48 states, a rapidly growing world industrial and financial power connected by rail, radio, telegraph, and telephone communications, and home to a growing urban, immigrant population. Television and aviation existed, but neither was ready for general use. World War One had transformed the country from a debtor nation into a creditor nation.

The 1920s were the culmination of the prosperity that came from all those developments. These new complexities set the stage for massive sociological, economic, and political change and launched the second crisis – almost 70 years after the first one. The world was far more complex sociologically than it had been 70 years earlier.

Herbert Hoover was the man in the White House when the roof fell in. Herbert Hoover, who preceded FDR as President, was widely perceived as responsible for the 1929 stock market crash and the serious depression that developed during Hoover’s term in office. By the end of his term, Hoover became soundly reviled by most of the public, similar to what President Barack Obama has experienced.

The spectacular 1929 stock market crash extended only from September 1929 to November 1929 and was attributable more to corrective market forces than to either any presidential actions or to the deteriorating economy. A major bull market followed the 1929 crash and continued until June 1930. Only then did the big, nearly three-year-long stock market trip to the bottom begin. This second stock market collapse was primarily a reflection of the failing economy and not the cause of the failure.

In Crisis Two, things fell apart to a far greater degree than just about anyone had thought possible. Financial difficulties fed on themselves as many solid loans and financial arrangements went bad along with the shaky ones. No doubt existed about the seriousness of the situation because the troubles were plainly visible, and everyone could see them everywhere. The economic disintegration had caused massive damage to the nation’s ability to produce food, clothing, and shelter. For many citizens, survival was now an issue.

The law required the Federal Reserve to protect the dollar by maintaining strong bank reserves, so the Fed had to raise interest rates to comply with the law. This tightening helped strangle the limping economy and made it impossible for many people and businesses to pay back bank loans. These bad loans then caused many banks to fail, making it progressively more difficult for the economy to work.

No economic group had wanted the troubles or benefitted from them, but there were plenty of simpletons with naively incomplete answers about how to fix things and whom to blame. The big difference between then and now is that today’s difficulties are not as overtly obvious as were those in the 1930s, but today many more simpletons are probably endowed with “the” answer. Complexity traps breed a backlash of simpletons.

The growing social, economic, and financial complexities after World War I eventually collapsed into chaotic simplicity and national despair. The situation provided the perfect setup for scapegoating those in positions of responsibility and blaming them for a colossal mess which they had only partly created. People love simple explanations for problems. Notice any similarities to today?

The 1932 election chose Franklin Delano Roosevelt as the next President in an atmosphere of much vitriol. The political tone of the times was not about to listen to the sitting President, even when his ideas made sense. Notice any similarities to today?

An opportunistic Congress had blocked Hoover’s ideas until FDR could get the credit for addressing the problems of the times. Notice any similarities to today? Indeed, Hoover had tried to carry out various of the ideas FDR implemented once he was in office.

The Hoover Presidency started at a time when civility and respect for both the presidency and the person of the president were normal but ended on a very different note. The nearly complete breakdown of political civility and growing political venom made the transition from Hoover to Roosevelt quite nasty and needlessly worsened the economic damage to the country. Notice any similarities to today?

During the transition period, Hoover repeatedly asked Roosevelt what he (Hoover) could do in his last days as President to smooth the transition into the Roosevelt Presidency and keep the crisis from becoming even worse. Roosevelt was not statesman enough to accept Hoover’s offer because he would not risk allowing a political “enemy” to be involved in part of the solution – even for the good of the country. More cooperation doubtless would have helped make the four-month transition between the presidents less damaging, but FDR saw increasing the damage to the country as a low price to pay to maximize the damage to a political opponent.

On Roosevelt’s inauguration day this situation rose to a crescendo of boorish indecency toward the departing President. Once the new President was sworn in, Hoover was forced to walk, alone, to the train station. No simple act of courtesy such as driving the former President to the train station or thanking him for giving his best efforts under often impossible circumstances occurred. Doing so would have risked both elevating the former President above demon level and reduced the “politically necessary” rancor the nation was feeling toward the “enemies” of the new administration. Notice any similarities to today?

Many people agreed with the actions taken by FDR to deal with the crisis, but many others were violently opposed, thinking the changes were a great mistake. The actions taken in the 1930s resulted in an intensely hot discussion between those who believed that FDR was saving the nation and those who believed that he was destroying it – a discussion that continues to this day.

Only one other instance of a catastrophic financial crisis has unfolded during the transition from a Republican President to a Democratic President. In the 2008 transition, George W. Bush and Barack Obama coordinated and cooperated effectively and with some gentility and civility. That situation was at high risk of becoming a financial Armageddon that would engulf the entire world, but fortunately, a few big men acted quickly and decisively to prevent disaster. The Presidential staffs focused on dealing with the problem at hand, not on vilifying their counterparts or maximizing their personal glory.

Both Trump and FDR have understood well that politics is theater and that their acting skills must be good enough to keep supporters from seeing through their performances. Conversely, it is equally important that their detractors see through the dishonesty and phoniness of those on the other side. This theater, in turn, feeds a self-reinforcing anger among the supporters and detractors, anger that further increases supporters’ motivation.

Building a power base via mutual vilification keeps the supporters as motivated as possible. This strategy works best when your supporters significantly, but not overwhelmingly, outnumber your detractors. You want your opponents to be strong enough to make a lot of threatening noise, but not strong enough to win. Although Lincoln did not extensively use vilification, it worked in 1862 and 1932, and it still works today.

The truth probably is that FDR saved the country from an even bigger disaster, but he also did some long-term damage in the process. The proud independence and self-reliance that most Americans had during the Depression lessened in the following decades and progressively more borrowing decreased the financial independence of most consumers.

This trend probably occurred because the growing complexity of post-Depression life gave people fewer simple, clear choices and less control over the growing complexities that they faced. Their slowly eroding self-reliance and decreasing ability to control their destiny and cope with growing complexity has forced people to look increasingly to the government for solutions to problems. This trend has not turned the land of the free and the home of the brave into the land of the freeloaders and the home of the bravado, but the trend is in that direction.

Crisis Three: The Cultural Crisis

The third great crisis, by the reckoning of J.D. Nobody‘s friend, arrived about 70 years after the previous crisis. J.D. Nobody‘s friend viewed this cultural crisis as probably the most serious of the crises to date because it goes to the heart of everything that the nation is. Everyone alive at the time of the first two crises could plainly see the troubles everywhere, whereas a cultural crisis is much more intangible and invisible. People know that something is very wrong but cannot clearly articulate what it is.

The more we reflect on the times in which we live, the more we notice the similarities between today and the times at the bottom of the Great Depression in 1932–1933. Both situations have involved colossal political upheavals having many similar crisis attributes. Emotions often transcend logic when such crises deepen.

In the first and third crises, many people threatened to leave the country if Abraham Lincoln or Donald Trump, respectively, were elected. Lincoln was thoroughly hated by much of the country for the duration of his presidency. Only after his death did Lincoln become a national hero.

Even though the party labels are reversed today, it is interesting that Donald Trump has learned presidential theater well from perhaps his best mentor – Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Both Trump and Roosevelt are renegade agents of change who are totally hated by “the establishment.” Both are men of great wealth who have put themselves forward as populists. Their most enthusiastic supporters are the people who hate wealth and privilege the most. Trump has gained their support by speaking to them in locker-room English rather than country club English and by dressing accordingly.

Roosevelt, like Trump, was notorious for glib double-talk that his supporters loved. FDR’s relentless vilification of bankers and industrialists played extremely well in Peoria but did little to build the bridges that could have helped heal the nation. In a sense, Roosevelt was a lifetime ahead of his time politically, with the difference being that he focused his double-talk on largely innocent bankers and industrialists, while Trump has focused his double-talk on Mexicans and Muslims.

Counterproductive slander is counterproductive slander, but it is a major ingredient in a crisis election. In pursuing the Presidency both Trump and Roosevelt have allowed the pursuit of political gain to demean both the office and the path to it.

One can only guess what psychological forces might have turned Trump and Roosevelt into emotional pieces of work obsessed with completely destroying their adversaries. Some of this would have been influenced by the homes in which they grew up. Trump hardly grew up in a gentle, teddy-bear atmosphere; FDR’s mother, Sarah Delano, was an overwhelming force in the lives of those around her, dominating FDR’s entire life until nearly the end of his second term as President.

In today’s history-exempt world almost nothing interconnects over time with anything else, and everything is somebody else’s fault. Nevertheless, the lives of FDR and Trump interconnect in that both came to the forefront in rapidly changing times with the recognition that the previous ways of doing things were on their way out. Theatrics and maverick behavior are the primary ways in which FDR and Trump have led their electorate away from the familiar and got the public to regard the newly evolving world as normal.

Of course, Trump is much cruder than FDR ever was, but we are living in much cruder times. Today the world is in an international cultural crisis, whereas FDR faced only a national financial crisis. After allowing for the differences between the times in which these two men have lived, their similarities stand out more strongly than do their differences. As long as people see history as bunk, people won’t connect many of these dots.

In short, both FDR and Trump are very wealthy men from the Establishment who have deep support from the common people. Both have been able to speak the language of the average person at times when that skill has mattered and to successfully appeal to those endowed with gullible ignorance.

History also says that, like FDR, if Trump is elected he will have his periods of political cheapness, such as 1933–1939, and periods of effective leadership, such as 1939–1945. Could today’s sins of Donald Trump be long-delayed and exaggerated blowback from the sins of FDR, and even from earlier leaders – a perverse payback, with compounded interest?

Now you can honestly say Nobody told me.

Copyright © 2016-2019 Charles E. Dial. All rights reserved.
Posted Jul 17, 2016 at 10:03. Revised Aug 14, 2019 at 08:17. –> Retrieved Aug 25, 2019 at 00:34.
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Myers-Briggs Meets Politics

Posted Apr 3, 2016 at 19:13. Revised Aug 14, 2019 at 08:17.

J.D. Nobody cannot help but notice the intuitive connections between some concepts from Jungian psychology and various personalities in the 2016 American presidential contest – Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders. The Myers-Briggs® psychological inventory (test) and its underlying Jungian concepts reveal much about commonalities between these two personalities that each would no doubt hotly deny. Looking at these personalities through Jungian and traditional Chinese eyes reveals some things that American eyes miss.

American eyes typically view conflicting situations as having “either-or” choices having simple, conflicting cause and effect relationships. The traditional Chinese and Jungian view sees such situations as being the result of two opposing forces that are bound together, normally work together, and only sometimes come into conflict with each other.

The Myers-Briggs approach to understanding different people provides a way for describing different personalities. It does not label personalities judgmentally, but descriptively, in the way that color can describe a car. There is nothing right or wrong or superior or inferior in the Myers-Briggs personality descriptions just as there is nothing inherently good or bad about a yellow vs. green car. In both cases, these are only descriptions, not judgments. Of course, an individual may like certain personality attributes more than others, but that is a separate matter from declaring a particular personality to be inherently good or bad.

To be continued.

Now you can honestly say Nobody told me.

Copyright © 2016-2019 Charles E. Dial. All rights reserved.
Posted Apr 3, 2016 at 19:13. Revised Aug 14, 2019 at 08:17. –> Retrieved Aug 25, 2019 at 00:34.
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America’s State Religion

Posted Feb 22, 2016 at 20:23. Revised Jul 8, 2019 at 06:53.

Contrary to popular opinion, America has an established state religion that has the full support of the government and the people. That religion is Utilitarianism, and its creed believes in and practices pragmatism over all else. Practicing this religion requires no sacrifice, inconvenience, or financial contribution by its members. It only requires one to act pragmatically in all matters.

Utilitarianism is the most inclusive of all the world’s religions. Christian? Muslim? Atheist? All are welcome in the Utilitarian Church and need to make no adjustments to or repudiation of their respective creeds.

You don’t understand the things that are going on in society, business, and government? All you need to understand is the religion that binds it all together preaches that everything in the world is rooted in pragmatism.

Utilitarianism is both a balm and a bomb for dealing with complexity.

The 4 M’s are critically important to the pragmatism that endows a Utilitarian with power, prestige, and position. These four roles are particularly treacherous because people functioning in any of them are dangerous, but the imprecision of these parts is a tool that a skillful Utilitarian can manipulate.

The 4 M characteristics are:

  • A. Military
  • A. Missionary
  • B. Minister
  • B. Medical

It is important for you to understand that although these roles look unrelated, they have a strong common thread that makes them a single state religion topic. Each of these fields of endeavor attracts people who are focused less on the pragmatism of the moment than they are in service and dedication to others. It is common for more than one of these idealistic presentations to occur in the same person, so keeping such a person dedicated to the pursuit of pragmatism can be difficult.

When you understand the 4 M’s as well as do our model evangelists at FirtstU you will see clearly that their time-proven principles for church command and control are central to all bureaucracies everywhere. They owe part of their success to their insight into how to use the 4 M’s to advance their power and glory through pragmatism.

Understand also that these 4 roles consist of two pairs of counterbalancing opposites that nevertheless cooperate with each other most of the time. This ying-yang concept of Eastern cultures is one of the cornerstones of pragmatism. The effective evangelist understands when to use the Eastern concept of counterbalancing opposite pieces that also work cooperatively, but can easily shift into the Western cause and effect way of looking at things whenever it is pragmatic. We are most familiar with cause and effect thinking, which assumes that when something good or bad happens there is one thing primarily responsible for causing it and that either strengthening or smashing the cause giving the particular result serves pragmatism perfectly.

The particularly important military case is so often misunderstood. Make no mistake, my evangelists; these people are both pragmatists and idealists and that fact will work to your advantage with a little skill. There is an obvious benefit to having a person around that follows orders and is loyal to his buddies to the point of giving up his life for them. Just make sure that he identifies you in his mind as one of his buddies and a deserving object for his loyalty.

Observe that there is a thread of idealism in military behavior that can threaten the pragmatism of your operation. Paradoxically, the shadow side nature of this idealism makes it a valuable antidote for any idealism that might erupt in your organization. This antidote works because the typical militarist so hates his shadow side idealism and so loves following orders that he will lash out decisively at any infestation of idealism that might raise its head.

Now you can honestly say Nobody told me.

Copyright © 2016-2019 Charles E. Dial. All rights reserved.
Posted Feb 22, 2016 at 20:23. Revised Jul 8, 2019 at 06:53. –> Retrieved Aug 25, 2019 at 00:34.
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The Importance of Being Nobody

Posted Feb 22, 2016 at 18:28. Revised Jul 15, 2019 at 07:17.

Being J.D. Nobody makes me a most important person. Indeed, millions of people quote me every day when they find themselves in a mess. The great beauty in being able to say “Nobody told me” is that no one can ever question you about whether it is true or false. You win either way when you quote me or pretend to quote me because it will be unclear to your listener whether the word “nobody” is a proper noun or just a convenient collective noun. Moreover, this tool which I am providing to the world is perfect for keeping honest lawyers honest.

The power I grant to you to quote me is unlimited, and it provides you with a “get out of jail free card” for use in any situation in which you have screwed up or are unjustly accused of screwing up.

Use this power wisely, and use it in full compliance with the creed of America’s one true state religion, embodied in the beliefs of The National Utilitarian Church. That simple and profound creed embodies our unswerving belief in pragmatism and nothing else.

Panic-filled pragmatism is the typical result of twenty-first-century complexity. Also, the more complexities people find in the world around them the more likely they are to seek too much simplification. The mission of The Complexity Trap and ScholarZero Publishing is to give you the cover you need to be able to say “Nobody told me” when someone challenges you. This response will be especially true when I, J.D. Nobody, have in fact told you something you don’t want to admit to knowing.

Now you can honestly say Nobody told me.

Copyright © 2016-2019 Charles E. Dial. All rights reserved.
Posted Feb 22, 2016 at 18:28. Revised Jul 15, 2019 at 07:17. –> Retrieved Aug 25, 2019 at 00:34.
Transcript News Feed: https://ct.complexitytrap.org/feed/